30 Ways to Screw up the Development of Your Employees

development

30 Ways to Screw up the Development of Your Employees

Getting people to learn, to change behaviour, to do and think differently is one of the biggest challenges facing any employer.

In recent years development has moved from being mainly employer-led to a shared activity with those on the receiving end. Consequently far more attention must be paid to what works and what doesn’t, when it comes to learning and development.

Also, pressure on budgets and demands for better evidence of the ROI on specific developments means there is less room for badly run learning events. Not only will managers not accept ineffective programmes, but participants too have greater expectations about the kind of experience they want.

Here are the top 30 ways that organisations fail to make development work:

 

1            RUNNING A ONE-OFF WORKSHOP AND HOPING FOR THE BEST

2            FAILING TO CLARIFY THE DESIRED AIMS AND OUTCOMES

3            LEAVING IT MAINLY TO THE HR DEPARTMENT

4            DELEGATING IT ALL TO LINE MANAGERS

5            AVOIDING GETTING SENIOR MANAGEMENT INVOLVED

6            ASSUMING MODELLING DOESN’T MATTER

7            CRAMMING IN TOO MUCH, TOO QUICKLY

8            BUILDING IN MINIMAL FOLLOW THROUGH

9            BELIEVING EVALUATION IS TOO DIFFICULT OR EXPENSIVE

10         GIVING A LOW PRIORITY TO EXCITING THE PARTICIPANTS

11         PRETENDING IT DOESN’T NEED PROJECT MANAGEMENT

12         IGNORING FEEDBACK FROM PARTICIPANTS

13         DRAGGING IT OUT FOR TOO LONG

14         DESIGNING FOR WHAT PEOPLE SAY THEY WANT, NOT WHAT THEY NEED

15         EXPECTING TOP MANAGEMENT TO KNOW EXACTLY WHAT SHOULD HAPPEN

16         STICKING TO THE PROGRAMME DESPITE ADVERSE EVIDENCE

17         ASSUMING EXTERNAL EXPERTS WON’T ADD MUCH

18         ASSUMING INFORMATION MATTERS MORE THAN BEING LIVELY AND STIMULATING

19         FAILING TO ACTIVELY MARKET THE PROGRAMME INTERNALLY

20         RELYING ENTIRELY ON-OFF SITE LEARNING

21         EXCESSIVE RELIANCE ON E-LEARNING

22         TAKING THE COMMITMENT OF PARTICIPANTS FOR GRANTED

23         PROVIDING PARTICIPANTS WITH MINIMAL SUPPORT

24         HOPING THE COST OF COACHING CAN BE AVOIDED

25         TREATING DEVELOPMENT AS A COST, RATHER THAN INVESTMENT

26         FORGETTING TO LINK THE PROGRAMME TO BUSINESS GOALS

27         IGNORING PEOPLE’S DIFFERENT LEARNING STYLES

28         TAKING FOR GRANTED PEOPLE WILL PUT THEIR NEW LEARNING INTO EFFECT

29         IGNORING THE HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT FOR NEW LEARNING

30         ASKING PARTICIPANTS TO DO TOO MUCH

 

 

All the above happen at some time. Just try to avoid doing them all at once!

 

 

 

 

 

1 Comment

  • Ron Denholm says:

    Importantly, number one: ‘RUNNING A ONE-OFF WORKSHOP AND HOPING FOR THE BEST’, will rip dollars from your pocket faster than a poker machine. Reverse all this by tailoring the workshop and then monitoring the outcomes.

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