What Leaders Learn When They Shadow Their Employees

What leaders learn when they shadow their employees - People Development Network
What leaders learn when they shadow their employees - People Development Network
S Chris Edmonds
S. Chris Edmonds is a speaker, author, and executive consultant. He shares insights on organizational culture, servant leadership, employee engagement, and workplace inspiration. He writes books and articles and records podcasts. In his free time, he's a working musician with the Brian Raine band in Denver, CO.
S Chris Edmonds

@scedmonds

I help leaders craft purposeful, positive, productive work cultures. Speaker, author, & executive consultant. Blogger & video-caster. @BrianRaineBand mate.
@LifeWithJohn 🙏🏼 - 1 hour ago
S Chris Edmonds

The concept behind the recent CBS television show, Undercover Boss – though the approach is a bit dramatic and underhanded – is that of a senior leader becoming a “secret employee” at their own business. These senior leaders learn about the real work lives that their employees experience.

In the purposeful, positive, productive organizations I study, senior leaders don’t see the “live in your employee’s shoes” opportunity as once-in-a-career but as a regular occurrence. When senior leaders take the time out from their daily strategic and administrative tasks and meetings, they can truly appreciate which policies and procedures help or hurt or hinder employee engagement, service, and results in their organizations. Instead of going undercover – let’s look at what it would be like to go side-by-side!

Employees know a great deal about what systems and norms enable effective performance and great customer experiences . . . and which policies and procedures inhibit them doing the right thing the right way the first time. Senior leaders need to honor their employee’s knowledge and savvy-ness by learning from their staff members, side-by-side.

Seek out a few employees who would be willing to have you shadow them for two hours on a given workday. Schedule appointments with them. Let’s say Bill is your first appointment; stand by Bill and observe him doing his job. At the end of that two hours, take Bill out for coffee or soda, and ask what gets in his way on a day-to-day basis. Inquire about how you can improve his work environment so he can perform better and serve customers perfectly. Act on his suggestions as soon as you can, and schedule your next “side-by-side” appointment with a different employee, in a different department.

Do this two times a week. Over the course of a year, you’ll meet over 100 employees and learn a bunch about their work environment. And, by acting on their suggestions, you’ll make significant workplace improvements that will inspire better performance, higher service delivery, and increased employee work passion.

How cool is that?