Have One Rule For Them And Another For The Team – Mistakes Managers Make

Have One Rule For Them And Another For The Team - People Development Magazine
Have One Rule For Them And Another For The Team - People Development Magazine

When leaders and managers have one rule for them

These leaders and managers have double standards.  They remind me of the classic Orwell novel “Animal Farm”.  Where the maxim “All animals are equal, but some assume different roles, elevated higher than others”, was used. There is always one rule for them and another for the team.

These leaders and managers will cut the budget and, therefore, ask staff to work with fewer resources. They will then proceed to take a bonus for themselves.  They give themselves flexible ways of working. This could be from home or a pattern of late or early hours. Contrarily they expect their people to work unsociable hours, which cut into their family or social lives.

They will give out elaborate mission statements setting out values of “transparency, openness and honesty”, for example. They then go and then appoint consultants or members of the team without advertising, tendering or assessing to make sure they have the right person for the job.  This is usually because they “trust their instincts”. So justify violating those values. Very often they are simply not consciously aware they are embedding the practice of one rule for them, and another for others.  They are just looking after themselves.

Effective leaders and managers

Effective leaders and managers understand all actions are noticed by their team.  They know they must be a walking, living breathing demonstration of the values and the standards they have set for their team.

Although they don’t have to be able to do everything an employee can do, they must be willing.   So, for example, if deadlines are tight and their employees must stay late to meet a pressing commitment, great leaders and managers will be there with their sleeves rolled up.

If costs are being cut and this means a reduction in resources, expenses, perks or pay, then they are in it with them.

They realise they are a part of the whole, and that their contribution counts.  They do not expect their employees to work or act in a certain way and then absolve themselves from such standards or values simply because they are the boss.  It is because they are the boss, they realise they must “do, be and say” in unison with the rest of the organisation.

Image by Arek Socha from Pixabay

Christina Lattimer
I help leaders develop self- mastery, helping them to become confident in their own inner guidance.I collaborate with leadership experts, managers and HR professionals to help them get their own message and unique services and products to a wide audience.
Christina Lattimer

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